Adrian Clayborn Working With James Harrison

May 17th, 2011

Football dominates Joe’s life. If he isn’t working on this site he’s watching the real man channel, the NFL Network, or listening to SiriusXM NFL Radio, or he is surfing for football news in the wee hours of the morning in between private moments of pining for that knock on the door from a cold, shivering, drenched Rachel Watson.

It was one of these moments — no, not a Rachel Watson moment — where Joe came up with some cool news.

Twittering at 1 a.m. Joe came across a post from Bucs first round draft pick Adrian Clayborn. He seemed bored from Arizona and was asking if there were any Bucs fans awake on the east coast. So Joe asked him who he was working out with.

Mere moments later, Clayborn responded.

a bunch of vets….james harrison, couple packs, rams guys, alot of guys to name.

So Clayborn is working out with Harrison and a couple of Packers? As Charlie Sheen would say, “Winning!” The fact that Clayborn is working out with Harrison gets Joe totally fired up.

There may not be a better guy for Clayborn to bond with. Harrison was an undrafted free agent with the Steelers and three times he was cut from the Steelers practice squad. But through hard work, sweat and toil, he is now the game’s best outside linebacker, a guy who should be lauded and held up as a standard for all NFL players by the suits in Manhattan.

But no! NFL hatchetman Roger Goodell is doing his very best to tear apart the very fabric of the NFL, a game we have all grown to love, treasure and covet.

Harrison is public enemy No. 1 in Goodell’s eyes. Harrison plays relentless football, physical football, football where men wince when crossing the line of scrimmage, football that quarterbacks have acid reflux over, football that is played through the whistle the way we were all taught to play football. The right way to play football, the correct way to play football.

Football that is America!

But this is just the opposite of what Goodell strives for. It’s almost as if secretly he wants there not to be a 2011 season, that’s the only logical reason for this utter nonsense that he fronts for his employers and this asinine lockout.

Not just that, if Goodell has his sinister way, the NFL will turn into a “game” that only drag queens from New Orleans and Fidel Castro worshippers in Greenwich Village with their dumbarse argyle sweaters, who hang in some low-rent coffeehouse listening to some two-bit, unemployed poet whine about the potato famine, will take a liking to.

If Joe wanted to watch flag football, he’d watch flag football!

Back to Clayborn, just thinking of him working with Harrison, there can be nothing bad coming out of that. Throw in working with some Packers who can bestow upon Clayborn the art of winning playoff games, this is just great stuff.

No, no eastern European hotties for Clayborn. He’s doing man’s work with real men, much to the chagrin of Goodell, who Joe is starting to believe is a wine-sipper.

21 Responses to “Adrian Clayborn Working With James Harrison”

  1. Atrain WD40 Says:

    Holy cow Joe… from the nFL is not doing enough to prevent injuries and take care of retired players injuries to James Harrison is just a hard working clean cut all american football player? really….

  2. Matt Says:

    Just wondering, do you like Goodell?

    ;)

  3. Joe Says:

    Matt:

    Initially Joe thought Goodell was fantastic. The past year Joe has grown to loathe him more by the week.

    At least with Pete Rozelle and Paul Tagliabue, they had the power of persuasion to get things done. While no one denied Rozell and Tagliabue worked for the owners, they always seemed to protect the good of the game. Goodell has shown none of that, zero. Rather, he comes across more of a lackey than anything. A friggin’ puppet who landed a hot wife.

    It was bad enough that the “tuck” rule and other nonsense about protecting quarterbacks happened under Tagliabue’s watch. Compared to what Goodell is doing, that rule is a blessing.

  4. Capt.Tim Says:

    Again, Joe is spot on! I can just see Goodell in his rocking chair, pinky finger extended, sipping Chardonnay, hoping the lock out last and last

  5. BKNYfootballhead Says:

    “Not just that, if Goodell has his sinister way, the NFL will turn into a “game” that only drag queens from New Orleans and Fidel Castro worshippers in Greenwich Village with their dumbarse argyle sweaters, who hang in some low-rent coffeehouse listening to some two-bit, unemployed poet whine about the potato famine, will take a liking to.”

    What’s wrong with drag queens enjoying football, Joe? And have you been to Greenwich Village since the 60′s? Lay off.

    Good article, otherwise. Hopefully Clayborn develops the nasty streak of Harrison and learns some pash rushing techniques from a fellow monster.

  6. Travis Says:

    Harrison is a beat, but hes not the best OLB in the NFL…
    ever heard of Damarcus Ware? easy the best OLB in the nfl. After that I would say Clay Matthews and Terrell Suggs are better, hell id even argue Lamar Woodley his teamate is “as good” if not better, not to mention much younger.

  7. Atrain WD40 Says:

    Travis is right and those guys do it without crowning the helmit!

  8. flmike Says:

    A friggin’ puppet who landed a hot wife.

    Nothing and I mean nothing says “Dumb Blonde” louder than the job description “Female Fox News Anchor”

  9. Joe Says:

    flmike:

    Jane Skinner is not blonde.

  10. BigMacAttack Says:

    Megan Kelly may be a lot of things, including a lawyer, hot body, babe, smokin drop dead gorgeous, slightly opinionated, but she is not dumb. Not even close. She makes more money in a day than most people do all year.

  11. Patrick Says:

    Don’t be knocking good poetry

  12. Funky Munkey Says:

    What a great guy to have mentor and teach you some technique moves. Clayborn is an explosive hitter. Lets hope he stays healthy and stays working out with players of Harrison’s caliber.

  13. Brad Says:

    Agree 100% on your take on the warden of the NFL Joe. Goodell has done more to ruin the sport than anyone. I do hope part of the new CBA lessens his power to impose his warden like penalties he puts on players. Personally if we are without any football this year I hope his arse is ran out of football and gets fired. Even if we do by a miracle get to see an entire season of football that he’s no where near the game. I like you Joe was a fan of Goodell early on but can’t stand the site of him now. Just the opposite feelings I have for Raheem.

  14. Joe Says:

    I do hope part of the new CBA lessens his power to impose his warden like penalties he puts on players.

    If it is for penalties on players for criminal behavior Joe’s all for it.

    Getting suspended because you played football and hit a guy “too hard,” that’s baloney.

  15. BamBamBuc Says:

    There’s not good answer for the “excessive hits” thing. It’s a catch 22. If Goodell “let’s them play” then the NFLPA whines and complains about the safety of it’s players and the NFL get’s stuck in another CBA issue in 5 years. If he cracks down on excessive hits, the fans bitch and moan about it not being football anymore. I think this is the one issue where there should be a third party involved that looks at the film and determines “intent”. If a guy leads with his helmet into the helmet of another player that is not lowering their helmet to brace for impact, that may be in a “vulnerable” state… then ok, maybe that guy should be fined or suspended. But other than that, let them play. Injuries will happen, not all can be prevented. There was a report recently that Ridell stated 40% of NLF players use the lowest rated helmet available to them. Kinda makes you think it’s their own fault if they’re unwilling to change helmets and get a concussion.

  16. EricInDC Says:

    Joe, I am sure you have read Peter King’s MMQB from this past Monday. What do you think about Chris Collinsworth’s analysis relayed in that piece? The idea of ending the draft and going to an uncapped system based on solely on free agency seems to me a bad idea, not the least of which is that it might send us down the road of Major League Baseball — and do you think in a system like that the Bucs would be the Kansas City Royals or the New York Yankees. Perhaps they strike gold like the Rays have with Friedman, but it certainly seems to stack the deck. And it is beyond debate that such actions would fundamentally change the game. This is not a simple issue, and Goodell and the owners are not simply selfish and bad. You said it yourself: there are like 15 sides to this debate. Try to see one more than just the player’s.

  17. k1ngAdroc Says:

    intent? come across the middle and intend on getting destroyed, period!

    Head hunters stand up! No one gets a inch without paying dearly for it. Whoever has the ball better watch the f out because 11 hats are coming that way……Any other attitude is bulls(p)it and i wouldn’t want to see your eyes looking back at me in the huddle

  18. Joe Says:

    EricInDC:

    Joe, I am sure you have read Peter King’s MMQB from this past Monday. What do you think about Chris Collinsworth’s analysis relayed in that piece?

    Joe isn’t sure. Half of Joe wants to believe him; the other half thinks it’s a PR stunt to drive traffic to his site.

    What will become of the Bucs if the courts decide what football should be, God help us.

  19. BamBamBuc Says:

    Who took this fight to the courts? Simple answer…. the NFL didn’t file an anti-trust suit against itself, nor did they ask for an injunction from a judge to lift the lockout. The players took this to the courts. We can go back and forth on who’s “fault” this is….

    The owners opted out of the CBA, it’s their fault. The Players Union decertified, it’s their fault, the NFL locked out the players, it’s their fault, the Players are asking for things that are absolutely ridiculous (no draft, no salary cap, etc) it’s their fault.

    Once it got to the courts, yes, the owners have fought to keep from being railroaded by the players and get things back to the bargaining table. They’ve fought to keep the lockout (in part as leverage, in part because opening for business means opening for lawsuits), and I can’t blame them. Just as I can’t blame the players for taking full advantage of the owners opting out of the CBA to dig in for everything they can get. I don’t want them to get everything, but I can’t blame them for trying.

  20. flmike Says:

    This is straight up the Owners fault, take a $9 Billion pie, the owners get the first billion no questions asked, then they split the other 8 with the players at what a 52% (players) /48 (owners) or something close to that percentage. What this is about is people like Jerry Jones & Dan Snydar who build temples to themselves then ask the players to pay for them by giving up a portion of their piece of the pie. This will end as soon as the owners have to pony up their own capital to make their stadium payments this summer, watch as soon as Jerry has to dig in the the working capital od the Cowboys to make that interest payment, all of a sudden he’ll be the cheerleader to get both sides back to the table.

  21. Pete Dutcher Says:

    But no! NFL hatchetman Roger Goodell is doing his very best to tear apart the very fabric of the NFL, a game we have all grown to love, treasure and covet.

    Wow, Joe, lol.

    You are really in a mood, huh?

    Are you sure your opinion isn’t partially colored by your personal views on the lockout?

    I have to agree though, there have been some crappy rule changes made…seems to me though, that they are always voted on at the owners meetings. Is that true?

    Goodell isn’t a great commish, but he’s passable. Better than having a McKay there, who would probably be worse.

    I say make Jon Gruden the commish! That would get veterans (except QBs) everything they want, there would be no need for a draft!

 
 

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