Sapp: Every Player Takes Snaps Off

June 25th, 2014

Talk defense with Lovie Smith and the Bucs head coach will express how he wants every last one of his players running to football all out, from the defensive line on back.

Lovie wants speed and an intense commitment to chase and hunt the football, no matter your size and position.

So knowing that, Joe raised an eyebrow — and had a good laugh — listening to a recent podcast of Warren Sapp on CBS Sports Radio in Atlanta. Iconic No. 99 said there is a limit to hustle, and, of course, Sapp told a story.

“Every player takes snaps off,” Sapp said. “Listen, I used to have a rule with Rod Marinelli. I’d say listen, ‘You want me to chase the screen for 25 yards, or you want me to rush the next down? You get one or the other.’ Because if I gotta make tackles 25 or 15 yards down the field, then we’re in for a long day.

“Let’s not play this, you know, take plays off or whatever, because that’s always the catch line.”

Now Joe must disagree with Sapp to a point. Every player does not take snaps off. Perhaps Sapp should have clarified to say every starter gives questionable effort once in a while.

However, Joe suspects Lovie won’t tolerate any sort of loafing for a good while. Why should he? That’s no way to set a standard for a new regime.

D.J. Moore, the Bucs cornerback who played for Lovie in Chicago, told Joe that Lovie often gives detailed player grades for practice, something that might be new for many on the team. Moore said he’d advise his teammates never to dare to give second-rate effort.

16 Responses to “Sapp: Every Player Takes Snaps Off”

  1. Theodore Says:

    I remember a play where Derrick Brooks just missed a sack and ended up downfield to make the tackle (and was called for a late hit because the player who caught the ball was just out of bounds).

  2. Netwalker Says:

    I think ‘play smart’ should be the tag line. Teams often loose in the fourth quarter because the D line is gassed from three quarters of ‘always’ running to the ball. Don’t waste energy, but know the difference between not wasting energy and taking plays off.

  3. Harry Says:

    It used to be, when we thought of “attention to detail”, that was what Schiano was all about. But the difference is in what you are giving attention to. Lovie, giving player grades to practice tells players they have to work harder in practice which clearly produces better player performances in games. I love Lovie!

  4. biff barker Says:

    Ah Warren! The master of the sugar coat!

  5. Buccfan37 Says:

    Against hurry up offenses the other side does get fatigued often, no matter the conditioning. Taking plays off is a part of the game. If you are too far out of the play direction why spend needed energy for the next play. Sure, a fumble could happen, needing to be closer to the play to have a chance to recover it. Sapp is just telling the truth.

  6. Tampabaybucfan Says:

    It would be very nice to score some points and get ahead once in a while…..not to say we could take a breather….but we could certainly rotate players in more.
    The key is quality depth…..we have that in some positions now…..TE, RB, DT, CB, S…..

  7. Couch Fan Says:

    Harry, where did you hear that at? Sounds like a great idea but never heard anything about Lovie giving players grades for practices.

  8. PRBucFan Says:

    I know he gives grades from week to week during the regular season per player.

  9. PRBucFan Says:

    And I’ll take Sapp’s word for it, after all, he actually played in the NFL..

  10. StPeteBucsFan Says:

    Isn’t this why we’re trying to build some depth on the Dline? So we can establish a rotation and gives guys a blow after chasing a running back 25 yards down the field.

    If I’m the coach I’d rather have Sapp make an effort on every play and then let him come to the bench for a breather.

    Isn’t that supposed to be part of the appeal of Clinton McDonald and Gholston. Are they not able to give GMAC a breather once in awhile?

    Outside of GMAC it seems like we have two players at every spot now.

  11. Jim Walker Says:

    Want to see an excellent example of loafing watch the Rams game last year and pay attention to Clayborne.

  12. The_Buc_Realist Says:

    @jim walker

    its hard to tell his “Loafing” and his “high motor that just means he can not get there” look similar.

  13. Jeffauer Says:

    Ask Jimmy Johnson, players aren’t created equal. This is surprising from Sapp because he was known for hid love of the game and effort/hustle was not an issue. In general I think it speaks of his leadership, now rifts with other players ie Chidi Ahanatu could been from this.

  14. BuccaneerBonzai Says:

    Couch Fan Says
    “Harry, where did you hear that at? Sounds like a great idea but never heard anything about Lovie giving players grades for practices.”

    Maybe try reading the article before commenting from now on? Lol

  15. Couch Fan Says:

    Read? Never! I skip straight to the comments so i can hear the haters and whiners call MGM childish names.

  16. SAMCRO Says:

    Sapp: ‘You want me to chase the screen for 25 yards, or you want me to rush the next down? You get one or the other.’ Because if I gotta make tackles 25 or 15 yards down the field, then we’re in for a long day.”
    ________________________________________________________

    Uh? YES

    You’re getting paid an extraordinary amount of money to perform. If I’m the coach and I see you taking plays off during a game, your butt will be on the inactive list or a bus out of town. Bring your lunch pail especially to a game that counts. I wouldn’t tolerate that crap. If you can’t play balls to the wall when the ball is snapped for one hour of actual football, then you belong on someone elses sorry team, or bagging groceries down at the local super market, and I don’t care who you are. If you can’t hustle on every play, then sit on the bench, and let others get more reps.

    ——————————————————-

    The other day I watched Jose Molina hit a routine ground ball to shortstop.
    I watched him jog real slow up the first base line while the short stop bobbled the ball. Dropped it and chased it down several feet away from him, gather it up, and throw Molina out at first by a eyelash. Now, if he had hustled he would have been safe at first. Instead we lost the game by one run. That’s B.S.

 
 

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