“Judge, Jury And Executioner”

May 12th, 2011

Joe despises lockout talk (Enough already. Just cut a deal.), but Bucs icon Derrick Brooks did offer an interesting a labor-related message yesterday that should peak the ears of Aqib Talib.

Brooks usually brings fresh insider knowledge on the NFL lockout during his Wednesday on-air visits with The Big Dog, Steve Duemig of WDAE-AM 620. Yesterday, Brooks talked about how the NFL discipline policy will be a major point during any eventual collective bargaining that would lead to a new labor agreement. Brooks said Roger Goodell is “judge, jury and executioner right now,” making the point that altering Goodell’s role or power would be important.

So where might that leave Talib if he isn’t found guilty of the Texas felony charge pending against him?

As it stands now, Goodell could still slap Talib with a hearty suspension after reviewing the facts of the case. But that could change in Talib’s favor with a new labor agreement.

Time appears to be on Talib’s side — and on the Bucs’ side. If the unfounded claims, courtesy of the St. Pete Times, that Talib will be cut when the lockout is over are bogus, then if Talib gets a light suspension or no suspension under a new labor deal, he’s still got plenty of trade value and on-field value for the Bucs.

17 Responses to ““Judge, Jury And Executioner””

  1. Macabee Says:

    Talib, not withstanding, I hope the Office of the Commissioner is reviewed and redirected to represent both players and coaches as well as owners. I know the inmates can’t be allowed to run the institution. But something is fundamentally un-American when a coach is not allowed to question a call or comment on said call during a press conference without the fear of a substantial fine. It is a clear violation of the First Amendment. No one individual should have absolute power where his/her opinion is not subject to appeal. You would think the NFL would be the first to recognize the importance of this basic American right.

  2. Chris FWC :) Says:

    I can’t believe there isn’t pictures and statues of Goodell at every NFL stadium.

    I want Goodell to address the NFL fans like Saddam did his people. From a balcony firing a gun.

  3. Pete Dutcher Says:

    I heard that interview…and I could have sworn Brooks said that the commisioner will always have that power.

    The players union would come into those situations AFTER a punishment is handed out by him. If they take that power away from him, the NFL may as well close up shop.

    The last thing it needs is red tape keeping undesrving players on the field. Immediate decisions must sometimes be made, otherwise the patients run the asylum.

  4. Pete Dutcher Says:

    But something is fundamentally un-American when a coach is not allowed to question a call or comment on said call during a press conference without the fear of a substantial fine. It is a clear violation of the First Amendment.

    This I kind of agree with.

    While I think coaches and players should be permitted to protest bad calls by refs, I don’t think players should be allowed to say everything that comes to mind during press conferences or interviews.

    I mean, think of what TO or Ocho would say.

    Ocho would have been cursing the bengals on tv long ago.

  5. Joe Says:

    But something is fundamentally un-American when a coach is not allowed to question a call or comment on said call during a press conference without the fear of a substantial fine.

    Good luck keeping your job by going on radio or TV and complaining about your boss and company policies.

    Sadly, getting fined or fired for whining about your place of employment in a public forum is quite American and… legal.

  6. Max Says:

    Joe you gotta just use real pictures from the press, that clip art is no good!

  7. Macabee Says:

    Nobody should be allowed to use profane language, defame your employers, or bring reproach on your organization either in word or by deed. I am referring to the simple expression of disagreement with the call on the Winslow endzone catch in the Detroit game as an example. The intent of my original post is to question arbitrary and absolute power absolutely.

  8. Thomas 2.2 Says:

    I disagree re the proposition that you should not be able to criticize a sports organization if you are a player. You absolutely are able to say that, the Glazers only care about the bottom line, for example if you are a player. Now you may face some repurcussions, but if things arent right – please speak up.

    I understand that there is contractual language that the Teams can argue gives the teams a basis to dock pay; that is why most don’s speak out.

    I wish some had more courage. For one reason, the players association provides them with free representation. If I were a player, I would complain about the Glazer’s low (although artificially above the old floor) payroll. These hacks are doing it the cheap way. Can you catch lightning in a bottle rarely? Sure, but you don’t need to if you spend for stars and draft correctly.

    I can’t stand you sheep who argue that you either build through the draft OR free agency. Those options arent mutually exclusive – do them both – all the time – every year – so you dont have to endure 3-13 with a virtually volunteer coach.

  9. Thomas 2.2 Says:

    don’t speak out

    sorry

  10. Joe Says:

    I disagree re the proposition that you should not be able to criticize a sports organization if you are a player. You absolutely are able to say that, the Glazers only care about the bottom line, for example if you are a player.

    LOL It’s a league rule, not team rule.

    Now you may face some repurcussions, but if things arent right – please speak up.

    Not many people are rich — or foolish — enough to risk a sweet gig in Florida for the sole act of bravado.

    Buffalo, maybe.

  11. McBuc Says:

    T 2.2…Uh, welcome to the real world…

    Joe, took the words out of my mouth about “freedom of speech”.

  12. McBuc Says:

    Actually T 2.2…Say hello to Micky while you are in fantasy land.

  13. BigMacAttack Says:

    Brooks is a smart guy and his timing here was very good, as usual. No one person should have the power that Goodell does, because he doesn’t own anything. My issue is with refs and speaking out against their continuing incompetence, which is not the same as speaking out against your boss, i.e. the person who signs your check. As a business owner it is wise to have an open door policy where your employees can speak freely, yet in private with you. However, nothing is worse than when an employee puts the boss on the spot in front of other employees or in public. They force you to make an example out of them, but sometimes you can see it coming and interrupt them before they go to far, offering them a way out to take it behind closed doors. Anyone can be replaced and that is the problem that teams like Cinci have gone through with Chad and players that think they can say anything in public. You lose all power and ability to govern when you let employees get away with undermining your authority. You can’t let it happen, even once. It’s like Pandora’s box.

  14. RastaMon Says:

    How about a ” Performance Bond” principle…if you perform all atheltic skills, obey all team rules…AFTER you retire or can not and will never play again the balance of all contracts with be paid in full….until then you will only have access to funds based on”the formula”….bottom line if you don’t phuck up as an NFL representive while playing you will have plenty of cash as a 20 sumthing to live on…with the motherload of $$$$$…when you will never play again…a performance bond

  15. McBuc Says:

    True Bigmac. Even if the refs are not the boss it should be behind closed doors…and for all we know it is. I cannot go out in public and tell our customer base that out test department is full of a bunch of morons that have no clue what they are doing, or that our quality control dept puts the K in quality, and expect the boss to not come down on me. You are 100% right in your post.

  16. thomas 2.2 Says:

    The difference between most jobs and that of a NFL player is: they are indpendent contractors as it relates to the teams. Their employer is officially the players union which contracts with the teams/league

    If there is a term in the CBA that doesnt allow players to criticize the teams, I have never heard of it. I have heard of the “conduct detrimental” type language that is put in contracts and that is keeping Gruden from slamming the Glazerhouses publicly (he also may have too much class for that now being two plus years removed).

    I realize that it isn’t smart to blast the org, but some players have done it; albeit usually ones that arent under contract. It seems that Carson Palmer has been critical of the Bengals.

    Barrett Ruud has a reason to frustrated with the or – I would be if I were him. I assume that his agent has advised him to try the “honey” approach – which is probably good advice.

    If the public knoew just how greedy the Glazers (and most NFL owners truly are) they would have a considerable upper-hand in the court of public opinion.

    I am starting to view ownership as white-collar criminals. These kids sacrifice their bodies for only a small percentage to earn lifetime earnings. The vats majority suffer srious permanent injuries and have little $ to show for it. Goodell is just doing his job defending his clients, it is the owners, notably the Glazers, that are the problem.

  17. BigMacAttack Says:

    RastaMon, I think that is a great idea. Too many young people that start making big money immediately leverage themselves beyond their means. You have to think long term, and few people do. Warren Buffett is the perfect example of living a frugal life and taking what you need and knowing when to say no to things that you don’t need.

    It is funny how more and more people these days view Smart Business Men that spend wisely and frugally as White Collar Criminals. Most that do see it that way never end up being in that class however. Raheem said it well, “Mentality before Reality”. It applies to so many different things.

 
 

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